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was innicnd baltimore, and i wonder that this wonderful library, theock national oceanic atmospheric shared. wonderful little library to reat these intertek pocket librariese that you treasure. singlewe focus library. pele w ih should ask first how many people here are weather junkies and how many watch the weatherig channel? more people watch the weather channel. [laughter] thank you. how many people watch the weather channel when there is no stormis coming?rip my kind of people. muse this is the kind of place you go because it is fantastic it ise s like a museum.ndwritt it is not used by outsiders and things stand on the shelves that should be a museum. i es's where the point raises inev california for a wider net. i was looking for things the card catalogue indicated.catalo he was very lucky because suddenly on the one shelf therea was no reason for me to look at this and it was not in the card only catalog, there was about this call of a letter bumble theok i would hold like onean document, and i thought i've got time i will look inside.ts in i look inside and there was an article from
in baltimore to honor our men and women in uniform from world part to. the time will not dim the glory of their deeds. the same can be said of the heroes and the victims of 9/11. the same can be said of their families, which channeled their grief into action to make america safer, whose commitment of time and generosity of spirit have given all of us strength and made our country stronger. indeed, time will never dim the memory of those who perished, the images of destruction and despair, the moment of pain and anguish, and will never dim the american people's spirit of unity in the wake of the attacks. time will never diminish the courage of our police, firefighters and all the first responders and with the 9/11 bill now all of the land, our country will continue to stand by them, indeed as well as in work. time has left the memories of 9/11 emblazoned on our hard for more than a decade. on this anniversary, and in the years to come, time will continue to tell the true story of 9/11, how the 9/11 families turned a national tragedy into a time of unity. how our country came together wi
because he moved the franchise to baltimore, so hugh takes that very personally. [laughter] but let me tell you something, hugh hewitt has been so kind and gracious, and he's a great friend of mine. 's great to promote tonight's event. he, of course, was a driving force behind the nixon library, and he's one of my best friends in the -- >> the second question is, why'd you stop at 50? [laughter] >> first edition. if this book does well, we'll do a second edition, i hope. >> next question back here. >> yes, sir. >> yeah, mike, what's the secret to winning in november? >> well, as we talked about raising the bar, you've got to vote. i can't tell you how many people i meet around the country, hard working people, dishwashers, legal immigrants who say i've never voted, but this is the year i have to vote for mitt romney. this is the year i've gotta vote. [applause] the enthusiasm is there, we just have got to translate that into actual, literal votes, and, you know, just -- and i say this all the time, it's very important to me, don't minimize or underestimate the power of prayer. prayer w
city in the country at the time. baltimore, maryland, was the second. and what concerned us, and we felt that we had read a lot about the history, the treatment, the poor treatment of the french toward the vietnamese, we were funding that war. in the 1950s. france as well. and, do you have any comments on our use of agent orange against the country that, as far as we could find, hadn't done anything to anybody? and were there any observations you came across on the 1968 democratic convention, and do you see any hope for this country learning something rather than perpetuating -- i did meet soldiers who said they saw shell oil trucks crossing the front lines into north vietnam. i don't know whether you came across any ties to the oil industry. as part of this. thank you. >> in terms of agent orange, i didn't actually run across much of that in terms of what i saw of the documents in the united states. it's one of these issues -- i mean, if i were alive in vietnam, i would have opposed american intervention. i think the situation over there was already complicated, and what u.s. inter
and up the baltimore/washington parkway called the national security agency where he had a long and illustrious career, and i've already alluded a bit to that as well. i've always considered general hayden an intelligence officer who wore a military uniform which i think is important in understanding his character and insight and why i think he's made an important impact on the intelligence discussion. he'll lead off with certain topics that we fed them earlier on to stimulate their thoughts on reflecting on their career, and then we'll follow with mr. woolsey and mr. goss. general hayden? [applause] .. but, that linkage between the intelligence person and the executive and then i will spend most of my time on that. but then i would like to talk a little bit about the relationship with congress. since we have a former member here in porter, i think he can illuminate far better than i. let me start with the relationship between the intelligence person and the decisionmaker. all right? the examples i will kind of use is the intelligence person at the national level and the decisio
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5